upyour-anus:

50 Shades Of Grey

upyour-anus:

50 Shades Of Grey

e-beatrice:

You’ll come to see that a man learns nothing from winning. The act of losing, however, can elicit great wisdom. Not least of which is, uh… how much more enjoyable it is to win. It’s inevitable to lose now and again. The trick is not to make a habit of it.

e-beatrice:

You’ll come to see that a man learns nothing from winning. The act of losing, however, can elicit great wisdom. Not least of which is, uh… how much more enjoyable it is to win. It’s inevitable to lose now and again. The trick is not to make a habit of it.

flowaei:

 f l o w a e i ✰

dutchster:

don’t forget these

"Sometimes you need to step outside, clear your head and remind yourself of who you are. And where you wanna be. And sometimes you have to venture outside your world in order to find yourself.”

ink4coffee:

I just want to take a moment and point out something quite interesting. In “It’s a Terrible Life,” 4.17, Sam and Dean are thrust into an alternate reality where they aren’t brothers, but both work for the same company. Sam is obviously a more home-grown boy, working in IT, while Dean is of a higher-class upbringing, wearing suits and sitting behind a big expensive desk in his own window office.
Now. Here’s where it’s interesting to me - their acting is quite brilliant.
Look at the way they both swing at the ghost. They’ve ‘never done this before’ … at least so far as they know. But they both use their own ‘experience’ from their ‘lives’ to influence how they approach the situation.
Sam swings with a baseball-like arm, suggesting his years of being in summer leagues and playing catch with dad in his American Pie life. His is much more horizontal in the follow through.
Dean, on the other hand, subtly swings with a  more golf-like air, suggesting his own interests (Daddy could pay for a set of clubs and lessons, and he obviously plays on his own as an adult, now, because we see him practice in his office). His has an upward-arc that evinces this idea.
It’s these little things about the show that always astound me. How a simple shot showing them gank a ghost can reveal so much character and backstory, even with characters that aren’t really REAL, but fabricated for some angel’s vindictive game.
I love Supernatural.

ink4coffee:

I just want to take a moment and point out something quite interesting. In “It’s a Terrible Life,” 4.17, Sam and Dean are thrust into an alternate reality where they aren’t brothers, but both work for the same company. Sam is obviously a more home-grown boy, working in IT, while Dean is of a higher-class upbringing, wearing suits and sitting behind a big expensive desk in his own window office.

Now. Here’s where it’s interesting to me - their acting is quite brilliant.

Look at the way they both swing at the ghost. They’ve ‘never done this before’ … at least so far as they know. But they both use their own ‘experience’ from their ‘lives’ to influence how they approach the situation.

Sam swings with a baseball-like arm, suggesting his years of being in summer leagues and playing catch with dad in his American Pie life. His is much more horizontal in the follow through.

Dean, on the other hand, subtly swings with a  more golf-like air, suggesting his own interests (Daddy could pay for a set of clubs and lessons, and he obviously plays on his own as an adult, now, because we see him practice in his office). His has an upward-arc that evinces this idea.

It’s these little things about the show that always astound me. How a simple shot showing them gank a ghost can reveal so much character and backstory, even with characters that aren’t really REAL, but fabricated for some angel’s vindictive game.

I love Supernatural.